Why don’t people in Linguistics use the term “translanguaging”?

I was walking around the HKU campus this past week when I ran into a booth peopled by undergraduates in the Linguistics Society. It was all about—translanguaging! But none of the displays or materials used the term “translanguaging,” and in this week’s post I attempt to explore why. I took photos of the display andContinue reading “Why don’t people in Linguistics use the term “translanguaging”?”

The “multi/plural turn”: A major trend in theorizing Second Language Acquisition

What is the “multi/plural” turn that changed our understanding of second language acquisition (SLA) around the start of the 21st century? This post explains (1) emergentism, a relatively new theory about how the language repertoire evolves across the lifespan, and (2) how emergentism suggests that we need to approach additional language acquisition from a multilingualContinue reading “The “multi/plural turn”: A major trend in theorizing Second Language Acquisition”

Definitions and examples of translanguaging: Do they remain justice-oriented? – Two lit reviews from the Global “North” and “South”

In 2017, Luis Poza, an assistant professor of Education in the U.S., examined 53 studies on translanguaging (1996-2014), investigating how the term was defined in each study, what examples were given, and what percentage of studies linked translanguaging to educational reform for linguistically and culturally marginalized students, as opposed to merely promising that translanguaging wouldContinue reading “Definitions and examples of translanguaging: Do they remain justice-oriented? – Two lit reviews from the Global “North” and “South””

The historical development of translanguaging – On the legacy of Ofelia García

No scholar of bi/multilingualism has had as large an impact as Ofelia García, with her far-reaching positive effect on education in the U.S. and internationally. In this post, I argue that we should focus on this far-reaching pedagogical effect—of how she conceptualizes language learners’ bi/multilingualism—which leads to a more socially just way of teaching languages,Continue reading “The historical development of translanguaging – On the legacy of Ofelia García”

Good news, bad news, and something to look forward to in 2021!

In the last semester of my PhD, I was auditing an advanced graduate seminar in psycholinguistics in which the professor began the three-hour meetings with the same exercise her children’s elementary school teachers used to do: “a rose, a thorn, or a bud.” The basic premise was to give students a choice to share oneContinue reading “Good news, bad news, and something to look forward to in 2021!”